World’s ‘oldest best man’ is on top form at 102

News4u-News Desk- A Scottish centenarian has officially bagged the “world’s oldest best man” after organising a stag do at the age of 102 that involved drinking shots of whisky.

Semi-retired farmer Dan Clement, who agreed to the honour for friend, Alex “Sandy” Little, 74, and bride Sue, had wedding guests in stitches with gags about a ploughman and his cows, the Mirror reported.

Clement, who has two children, four grandchildren and one great grandchild, was a best man once before in the 1940s and was happy to take up the role again for the jolly couple, for whom age was never a consideration.

He was presented with his Guinness World Records certificate at Dunjop Nursing Home in Bridge of Dee, near Dumfries, this month.

Dan’s long-standing friend Heather Dodds said that it was a wonderful day as the minister presented it to him with a bottle of Guinness, which was a nice touch. The whole thing was lovely. (ANI)

World’s ‘oldest best man’ is on top form at 102

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This fast-melting glacier can change world’s coastlines forever

News4u-News Desk- A new study has revealed that a vast ice sheet in northeast Greenland has begun a phase of speeded-up ice loss, contributing to destabilization that will cause global sea-level rise for “decades to come.”

A team of scientists from the University of Kansas found that since 2012 warmer air and sea temperatures have caused the Zachariae Isstrom ice sheet to “retreat rapidly along a downward-sloping, marine-based bed.”

By itself, the Zachariae Isstrom glacier holds enough water to trigger a half-meter rise in ocean levels around the world.

The acceleration rate of its ice velocity tripled, melting of its residual ice shelf and thinning of its grounded portion doubled, and calving is occurring at its grounding line, the authors wrote.

Ice loss is happening fast in glaciological terms, but slow in human terms, not all in one day or one year, said associate scientist John Paden.

Within a few generations, ice loss could make a substantial difference in sea levels, Paden said, adding “When you add up all the glaciers that are retreating, it will make a difference to a large number of people. Sea level has increased some over the last century, but only a small number of people have been affected compared to what is likely to come.”

The study appears in Science magazine. (ANI)

glacier

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World may ‘seem grey’, when we ‘feel blue’

News4u-Features Desk-A new study has suggested that sadness may actually change how we perceive color.

Researchers found that participants who were induced to feel sad were less accurate in identifying colors on the blue-yellow axis than those who were led to feel amused or emotionally neutral.

First author Christopher Thorstenson of the University of Rochester said that the results show that mood and emotion can affect how people see the world around them, adding that their work advances the study of perception by showing that sadness specifically impairs basic visual processes that are involved in perceiving color.

The findings suggest that sadness is specifically responsible for the differences in color perception.

Thorstenson points out that this research charts new territory, and that follow-up studies are essential to fully understanding the relationship between emotion and color perception:

The research is published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (ANI)

World may ‘seem grey’, when we ‘feel blue’

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Tracking world`s permafrost thawing

News4u-Travel Desk- A new data network has been developed to track the world’s permafrost meltdown.

In the data portal, the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost, researchers first collect all the existing permafrost temperature and active thickness layer data from Arctic, Antarctic and mountain permafrost regions and then make it freely available for download.

This new portal can serve as an early warning system for researchers and decision-makers around the globe.

Although the world’s permafrost is one of the most important pieces in Earth’s climate-system puzzle, to date it has been missing in most climate models.

The reason: data on temperature and the active layer thickness were neither comprehensive nor were they available in a standard format suitable for modelling. With the new Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost (GTN-P), scientists from 25 countries have now filled this gap in the data.

Permafrost expert Hugues Lantuit from Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) said that if researchers want to understand the extent to which climate change is causing the permafrost to thaw and the effect this thawing will in turn have on the climate, they have to closely observe these regions around the globe, and we also have to make our measurements freely available.

This can only work if it is based on international cooperation, which we managed to achieve comprehensively for the first time in this project, he added.

International climate research benefits from the database in two ways: Firstly, researchers are making global permafrost information available in a standard format, allowing it to be easily used in climate models and at the same time, they have also analysed the distribution of the measuring stations using statistical methods and can now say in which permafrost regions new stations for measuring permafrost temperature and active layer thickness are most urgently needed in order to make global climate models more reliable, stresses permafrost researcher Vladimir Romanovsky.

The study appears in an open access article on the Earth System Science Data portal. (ANI)

Tracking world`s permafrost thawing

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India among world`s worst places for oldies?

News4u-News Desk- India is ranked among the world’s worst place to grow old, as per the latest Global AgeWatch Index from HelpAge International and the University of Southampton.

Switzerland is the best place in the world to live for those aged 60 and over, while India, where 116.6 million people over 60 are living, ranks a dismal 71st among 96 countries when it comes to social and economic wellbeing of older people.

The report found that Switzerland is the best place to live for those aged 60 and over, followed by Norway and Sweden.

Germany was the fourth best place for older people to live, Canada stood at fifth, followed by Netherlands, Iceland, Japan, US, UK and Denmark.

Afghanistan (96) is ranked last. (ANI)

India among world`s worst places for oldies?

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Spain’s El Celler de Can Roca reclaims world’s best restaurant crown

News4u-Travel Desk- Girona-based El Celler de Can Roca has reclaimed its crown as the world’s top restaurant in 2015.

2014′s winner Danish restaurant Noma slipped to third after Osteria Francescana won second place, the Independent reported.

The highest-placed British entry was Heston Blumenthal’s Dinner in seventh place, while The Ledbury in London also placed highly at 20th, although it was down 10 places since last year.

There is a notable absence of any French restaurants in the top 10.

Rating Dinner, the World’s Best Restaurant described it as “a modern-day celebration of 600 years of British cooking”. The two restaurants had moved down two and 10 places respectively.

The list is made up of votes of more than 900 international leaders in the restaurant industry, who each cast seven votes, but has come under criticism for the way that it is assembled.

French chef Joel Robuchon said that voters are supposed to have eaten in the restaurants they vote for at least once in the preceding 18 months, but no proof of their visit, no expense bill is required, which is a major loophole in the process.

William Drew, group editor of The World’s 50 Best Restaurants, said that it has been a hugely exciting year with such a variety of culinary talents celebrated here tonight.

Drew added that the list is created from the votes of almost 1,000 independent experts from across the world. Neither the organizers, nor any of the sponsors, can vote or influence the voting or the results. (ANI)

Spain’s El Celler de Can Roca reclaims world’s best restaurant crown

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